Posts Tagged ‘defense lawyer’

Criminal Defense in Aurora, IL. Sometimes the Police Make it Easier for Criminal Defense Lawyers to Win, but Make the Citizen’s Life Miserable

Monday, November 16th, 2015

Imagine having to see a criminal defense lawyer on criminal charges simply because you were an invited guest to a house or apartment, even if that person inviting you was your mother. And not just a misdemeanor either, but a felony charge. And now you have to pay the criminal defense lawyer and you’re out that money even if you win. Welcome to Aurora, Kane County IL., as well as DuPage County.

The Aurora Police Department justifies this through something called a Trespass Agreement. The agreement is one page long and it’s between the police department and the landlord. The Aurora Police have repeatedly interpreted this as an agreement that allows officers to screen everybody going in and out of a place simply because they do not recognize them. They claim it helps them monitor troubled areas by creating a ban list, allowing arrests for trespass, and it is a way to work with the landlord to reduce problem areas. Here are the obvious problems.

Foremost, Illinois law, reflective of both State and Federal Constitutions, allows us to invite over whomever we damn well want to invite over. This principle does not change whether the neighborhood is full of mansions or the high-density apartment complex. In order to allow ban lists of any kind – the agreement must BE IN THE TENANT’S LEASE! After all, how can third parties contract away OUR rights to invite over whom we please? They can’t, but in Aurora, IL, they do, and press criminal charges to boot. If a person is considering whether to rent an apartment and such a ban list is a condition of the lease, then that prospective tenant can consider that provision before signing, and then choose to agree to it and move in, or not agree to it and live elsewhere, but third parties cannot do it for them.

I’ve had several cases involving the Aurora Police and these so-called Trespass Agreements. In each case the agreements have been around five, ten, or more years, and these officers still testify that the neighborhood is a high crime, high-drug area. Well then, either these officers are lying in order to justify the reasons for stopping the defendant or the trespass agreements haven’t been working to reduce crime.

What’s worse, the Aurora Police know that the Illinois Supreme and Appellate Courts have ruled that trespass agreements that are not part of the tenant’s agreed lease are void; also, even if in the lease, they cannot be used to justify stops of people simply because the officer doesn’t know the person. Still, the Aurora police do it, and I have a case now where the Aurora police have made four trespass arrests on a person with no other criminal history and, after talking with the landlord – nope – there’s nothing in the lease about trespass agreements.

Is it arrogance, or something worse? I blogged about Trespass Agreements a while ago, and won two motions since. All in Aurora, IL. The Kane County State’s Attorney’s Office, to their credit, has dropped a few of these cases too. It is hard to imagine the Aurora Police, who also review decisions from our courts and have lost repeated cases, aren’t fully aware. Regardless, here we go again.

Criminal Defendants, Criminal Charges and their Criminal Cases: Who are “THOSE” People?

Wednesday, October 26th, 2011

As a criminal defense lawyer, defending a lot of felonies cases and drug defense cases, I often get asked by people who are not criminal defense lawyers: “How can you represent those people?” Of course I know they’re talking about criminal defendants charged with crimes. But “those” people are sons, daughters, spouses, parents, co-workers, friends, and so on – not just mere people charged with criminal offenses. And, guess what, “those” people are quite often innocent of the crimes they’ve been charged with. Oftentimes the police or the prosecution overcharge people with criminal charges, such as intent to deliver on drug cases. I’ve seen intent to deliver charged with misdemeanor amounts of cannabis and near-residue amounts of controlled substances, which, if convicted on such higher-grade criminal charges, bars most options for treatment. 

     Some people who have asked me the question, “How can you represent THOSE people” have later on needed my criminal defense lawyer services, and have appreciated my work in a criminal court on their behalf.

     That is why, to this criminal defense attorney, I much rather use the words “Defending the Accused” than making any reference telling a person that they are criminal defendants. They are presumed innocent, after all, the foundation of our criminal justice system, and are often in fact not guilty and, if guilty, were sometimes arrested via unlawful police conduct.

     Even if someone is caught “dead-to-rights” as a person subjected to a criminal charge, the person still needs to be treated like a human being – because they are. It does a criminal defense lawyer no good to look down his or her nose at “THOSE” people, but instead must give the client a chance to talk, to explain how or why; at the drug addiction seminars I have attended, I learned that drug addicts have often been abused physically as well as emotionally, and have already had their share of being on the receiving end of yelling and lecturing, without much chance to talk. There is great power in telling the drug addict, for example, that it’s his or her turn to talk, and for the criminal defense lawyer to listen. That alone is often a first in the lives of many.

      With all the alternatives available to a person in terms of drug treatment and counseling, how in the world can a criminal defense lawyer know what to do if we don’t, you know, shut up and listen? I was humbled when,  about ten months ago, I was told just that by a client. I did shut up. He did talk and I heard and I listened. Doing so allowed this criminal defense attorney to talk to the right people within Kane County’s highly effective drug court; doing so also allowed the client a chance to hear things from his own mind out loud, causing him to hear the sound of his situation in his own words, inspiring him even more to make positive changes in his life. He is now ten months in recovery. Is there a connection to a criminal defense lawyer shutting up when talking with the client? – well, he’s the one succeeding, let’s leave it at that.

     So – to all “THOSE PEOPLE” asking how can I represent “THOSE PEOPLE”? – my answer is: If it ever becomes necessary, I’d be happy to represent you or anyone else, if the need arises, and to do so with the respect any person deserves.

Criminal Defense Lawyer and Criminal Charges and the Client’s Future

Monday, September 21st, 2009

What does it mean to be a criminal defense lawyer in Aurora, Illinois, or anywhere in Kane County, DuPage County, Dekalb County, or Kendall County? Obvious answers include looking at every detail, going to the crime scene, finding witnesses where others, including the police, wouldn’t think to look. How about sticking with your client even after the case is over? As an example, DUI laws in Illinois change every year and grow more complex. It is important that a client know what to do even after a case is over. Today, as is my usual practice, I sat with my client after the case was over, and walked him through the clerk’s office and the probation department in DuPage County. A problem arose in that the clerk, although no fault of her own, had failed to register the plea negotiation’s orders. Had I not stayed with my client for the processing of the case after the plea, the problem would not have been caught, my client would have been sitting around for hours on end not knowing what was going on. Instead, I realized the problem, returned to the courtroom, straightened it out, and explained the problem to my client. He didn’t have to stick around but could get on with his day. Perhaps this doesn’t seem like a big deal. But I know that a client who leaves without getting a full, careful explanation of his or her case is much more likely to fail at probation or supervision, and come back with more problems and more legal fees, and a risk of jail. Staying with the client, being available to answer questions even after a case is through is my practice. I’d much rather have clients refer someone new to me because of my work, but not themselves on new cases. And if there is a new problem which the client did not cause, I will not charge a new fee.

It’s easy to claim how hard someone works at motions and trials. I hope my track record speaks for itself. But what most people want is success, and that often takes a lawyer who is there after the case is through. Today, this policy proved vital for my client. And, by the way, in his DUI case, his driving privileges suspension was dismissed as well!