Criminal Defendants, Criminal Charges and their Criminal Cases: Who are “THOSE” People?

As a criminal defense lawyer, defending a lot of felonies cases and drug defense cases, I often get asked by people who are not criminal defense lawyers: “How can you represent those people?” Of course I know they’re talking about criminal defendants charged with crimes. But “those” people are sons, daughters, spouses, parents, co-workers, friends, and so on – not just mere people charged with criminal offenses. And, guess what, “those” people are quite often innocent of the crimes they’ve been charged with. Oftentimes the police or the prosecution overcharge people with criminal charges, such as intent to deliver on drug cases. I’ve seen intent to deliver charged with misdemeanor amounts of cannabis and near-residue amounts of controlled substances, which, if convicted on such higher-grade criminal charges, bars most options for treatment. 

     Some people who have asked me the question, “How can you represent THOSE people” have later on needed my criminal defense lawyer services, and have appreciated my work in a criminal court on their behalf.

     That is why, to this criminal defense attorney, I much rather use the words “Defending the Accused” than making any reference telling a person that they are criminal defendants. They are presumed innocent, after all, the foundation of our criminal justice system, and are often in fact not guilty and, if guilty, were sometimes arrested via unlawful police conduct.

     Even if someone is caught “dead-to-rights” as a person subjected to a criminal charge, the person still needs to be treated like a human being – because they are. It does a criminal defense lawyer no good to look down his or her nose at “THOSE” people, but instead must give the client a chance to talk, to explain how or why; at the drug addiction seminars I have attended, I learned that drug addicts have often been abused physically as well as emotionally, and have already had their share of being on the receiving end of yelling and lecturing, without much chance to talk. There is great power in telling the drug addict, for example, that it’s his or her turn to talk, and for the criminal defense lawyer to listen. That alone is often a first in the lives of many.

      With all the alternatives available to a person in terms of drug treatment and counseling, how in the world can a criminal defense lawyer know what to do if we don’t, you know, shut up and listen? I was humbled when,  about ten months ago, I was told just that by a client. I did shut up. He did talk and I heard and I listened. Doing so allowed this criminal defense attorney to talk to the right people within Kane County’s highly effective drug court; doing so also allowed the client a chance to hear things from his own mind out loud, causing him to hear the sound of his situation in his own words, inspiring him even more to make positive changes in his life. He is now ten months in recovery. Is there a connection to a criminal defense lawyer shutting up when talking with the client? – well, he’s the one succeeding, let’s leave it at that.

     So – to all “THOSE PEOPLE” asking how can I represent “THOSE PEOPLE”? – my answer is: If it ever becomes necessary, I’d be happy to represent you or anyone else, if the need arises, and to do so with the respect any person deserves.

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